Laparoscopic Hernia Repair

Section 1

Section 2

Section 3

  • Laparosopic repair-the technique
  • Transabdominal preperitoneal repair of inguinal hernia
  • Total extra peritoneal repair
  • Two port TEP.
  • Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair
  • Diaphragmatic hernias in adult
  • Laparoscopic hiatus hernia repair
  • Pediatric hernia repair

Laparoscopic Hernia Repair - How to Learn at Ease
By
Dr. R. Padmakumar
Dr. Madhukar Pai & Dr. Farish Shams

Section 4

  • Difficulties encountered during laparoscopic hernia repair
  • Complications
  • Frequent queries and answers from experts

Section 5

  • Hernia in general

Related Links

Ventral Hernia

A ventral hernia can occur in any location of the abdominal wall as a bulge of tissues of abdominal tissues through a weak opening in the abdominal wall muscles. When the intestinal tissue gets tightly caught as a bulge in the abdominal wall, then the condition is termed as strangulated ventral hernia. In this case […]

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Obturator Hernia

A hernia is caused when the abdominal tissue protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal wall as a sac of tissues. An obturator hernia is a very rare type of hernia that occurs when the intestine tissues through an opening in the pelvis.  The obturator foramen is an opening in the pelvis through which blood vessels […]

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Femoral Hernia

A femoral hernia occurs in the groin junction when the tissues in the lower abdomen push through the upper thigh region. Femoral hernia is common in women as the pelvis region is wider in women when compared to men.  Femoral canal contain the ligaments and functions to hold and support the uterus in position. Symptoms […]

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Inguinal Region – Anatomy, Peritoneal Landmarks, Infraumbilical Fossae

Anatomy of the Inguinal Region The ‘Myopectineal Orifice of Fruchaud’ All groin (inguinofemoral) hernias originate in a single weak area called the myopectineal orifice. This oval, funnel-like, ‘potential’ orifice formed by the following structures, makes the ‘myopectineal orifice of Fruchaud’. -Henry Fruchaud Boundaries Superiorly Internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles. Inferiorly Superior pubic ramus. Medially […]

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Laparoscopy set to replace Traditional Treatment – Laparoscopy vs Open

Laparoscopy Laparoscopy: As the name suggests ‘Laparo’ means abdomen, ‘Scopy’ means vision. The surgeon visualizes the inner parts of the patients body through the laparoscope which is a small cut (incision 5-10 mm) on the abdomen. The magnified (up to 20 times larger) vision of the interior parts through the telescope is quite different from […]

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